Related Artwork and Collectibles

This section of the wiki is dedicated to art and other collectibles that are not animation art, but are closely related. Examples include: original artwork by animators (shikishi), original artwork used in printed material, original comic/manga art, etc.

Shikishi - 色紙

The Basics

Shikishi boards are made by laminating Gasen rice paper to a hardboard backing. The edges are generally trimmed in gold, the most common size for collecting autographs and artwork measure: 9 5/8" by 10 3/4".  Shikishi are traditionally used for sumi, calligraphy, watercolor and haiku. They are also popular for autographs and anime artwork.

Shikishi like most paper products come in different levels of quality and methods of production.  When buying art from a source, you are almost never going to know on what type or quality of board the artist did the work on.  For preservation purposes I would recommend just always assume the worst (this will be more relevant to the preservation section later).  Cutiebunny, (she has an extensive Shikishi collection and is my Shikishi Senpai!) recommends that when you are buying Shikishi specifically to request art from a guest that you use either Sumitomo or the Copic Brand Shikishi, as they are both guaranteed to be acid free, this is questionable when you go to your nearest Daiso and get the 3 pack of Shikishi Boards for a couple bucks :( (I still buy these but mostly as boards for guests I'm not as interested in, but I don't want to be rude).  If you really want to next level it, bring a small selection of Copic markers for the guests to use on your board, as Permanent Markers that conventions supply, while acid free, do not always have the best tip and have a tendency to bleed if anything should god forbid happen to your board.

Getting Shikishi Art at Conventions

This is getting harder and harder every year.  As conventions get more corporate and anime gets more popular there is much less of a chance to interact with guests and get that prized 5 minute sketch from the artist or character designer you are most interested in.  Here are some basic guidelines:

  1. BE POLITE - To everyone this includes the staff, the guests, and fellow con goers.  
  2. DON'T ask staff BEFORE OR AFTER the autograph session starts if you can get a sketch.  This almost always puts the Kabash on any sketch you might be able to get from the guest (s) you are aiming for.
  3. Get in line EARLY, it is best if you are at the head of the line if at all possible.
  4. When it is time to get your sketch have your materials ready! Shikishi at the ready with your marker, and if you are asking for a particular character have a REFERENCE ready on your phone!
  5. AGAIN I cannot stress this enough, be nice!  I usually bounce up to the guest (I get excited) and hold out the shikishi to them to take and ask if they will draw the character I am requesting and show them my phone. ^_^
  6. The last step is either excited gushing cause they are drawing for you... or be nice and thank them for your autograph you can ALWAYS try again at a different con it is VERY important you be gracious AND thankful at ALL times do NOT leave a bad taste in the guests mouth!
line-doodle.jpeg
Shikishi by: Adachi Shingo - Acquired at Animazement 2016 - Kirito (SAO) - Sword Art Online

 

Getting Shikishi Art at Convention Charity Auctions

Start saving NOW, I am not kidding.  Charity auction Shikishi are high dollar items, they will go for anywhere between $1,000 to $3,000 each depending on the guest.  At Anime Fest Dallas during the height of the Yuri!!! On Ice craze the Shikishi Mitsurou Kubo (the creator) drew of Katsuki Yuri went for over $7,000.  You can occasionally get them for cheaper if the guest is not as well known, but definitely plan to bring at least 1K, as this is not a common occurrence.

One of the nice things about the charity auction sketches is that usually a lot of time and care is put into them so they will be more detailed than a convention doodle you get for free in line.  Also in some cases the convention you get your sketches from will give you a tax form so you can write your charitable donation off on your taxes.